Making Progress Possible

With an unparalleled bias for action, we proactively advocate for transformative city planning and legislation that helps ensure Denver remains a vibrant, world-class city.

Working collaboratively with our partners, including the City and County of Denver, we advocate for policies that facilitate establishing Downtown Denver as one of the most economically powerful center cities in the country. We work to ensure that legislative and ballot issues and City policies positively impact our Members and all Downtown businesses.

Together, we make progress possible.

Downtown Denver Partnership supports Let's Go Colorado

Support: Let's Go Colorado - Initiative 110

Proposed 0.62% percent sales tax (62 cents on $100) over 20 years that would provide money to the State Highway Fund (45 percent), Local Transportation Priorities Fund: Cities (20 percent) and Counties (20 percent), and a Multimodal Transportation Fund (15 percent). The projected revenue for the first year is $767 million. Why vote YES: We know that our transportation funding across the state have been under-funded for years and our city’s economic growth also depends on a strong transportation network—not just here downtown, but throughout the state and region. Voting ‘Yes’ on ballot initiative 110 will help ensure a stronger, more connected transportation network—vital to our economic growth.

Denver Parks Need Funding

Support: Healthy Parks and Rivers for Everyone

Proposed 0.25% sales tax (25 cents on $100) increase. This measure was referred by Denver City Council to raise an additional $45 million annually to fund parks and open space in the City and County of Denver. Why vote YES: The Downtown Area Plan calls for a greener city, and we know that parks and public spaces are a key part of that strategy. Core to our work is the understanding that well-managed, maintained and activated public parks enhance public safety, quality of life and economic growth. Voting ‘Yes’ on funding for Parks creates a dedicated funding stream for parks and open space as called for in the Outdoor Downtown Plan.

Support Caring for Denver

Support: Caring for Denver

Proposed 0.25% sales tax (25 cents on $100) increase to raise $45 million annually to fund mental health and addiction services for children and adults in the City and County of Denver. Why vote YES: Mental health and drug addiction is an issue that we see and deal with every day as we work to build a safe, welcoming and inclusive center city. Voting ‘Yes’ on this initiative will help us begin to more seriously address mental health and addition in our city.

Supported and Passed: Recent Policy Advocacy Successes

With an unparalleled bias for action, we proactively advocate for transformative city planning and legislation that helps ensure Denver remains a vibrant, world-class city. The Downtown Denver Partnership has successfully advocated for these and other important policies and initiatives.

Against: Amendment 73, Funding for Public Schools

Amendment 73 is a band-aid approach to an issue that requires statewide support. Does not account for inflation and puts significant burden on small businesses. Generally, the Downtown Denver Partnership supports education and the need for additional funding for our schools but is not in favor of a measure that would amend the State constitution.

Against: Proposition 109, Fix Our Damn Roads

“Fix our Damn Roads,” allows the state to take out $3.5 billion in bonds to address state transportation projects without providing a dedicated source of revenue to pay that debt, and the debt accrued only triggers $2.2 million bonding capacity. The absence of a new revenue source would draw from state resources currently allocated to critical needs like health care and schools would have to be reallocated to transportation. The Downtown Denver Partnership is committed to mobility options for the city and state, yet this initiative only addresses projects on state roads (those managed by CDOT), meaning 88 percent of roads (which are managed by local governments) in Colorado are left with no funding at all.